How to React if a Power Line Falls on Your Car

Ementes Technologies
Ementes Technologies

It is one of the most terrifying things that can happen to you while driving when a power line falls on top of your vehicle. It is possible that if an active power line falls onto your car, it will charge the vehicle with electricity, requiring you to exercise extreme caution in order to avoid becoming electrocuted. Please call 911 and remain in your vehicle, taking care not to touch the car’s frame. If your automobile is not on fire, call 911 and remain in your vehicle. If your car is on fire, get out of it as quickly as possible by jumping free of the vehicle without coming into contact with the metal interior of the vehicle. Keep your legs together as you shuffle to safety, keeping both of your feet together on the ground until you’re 50 feet away from the vehicle. If you return to your parked car and discover that a power line has fallen on it, call 911 immediately and avoid approaching the vehicle.

Method 1 Acting After the Line Falls

1. If at all possible, remain inside the vehicle. If a power line falls on your vehicle, it is critical that you remain inside your vehicle unless it is on fire. Whenever a power line falls on your car, it frequently charges the metal parts of the vehicle with electrical current, which means that if you attempt to exit the vehicle as you normally would, your life will be in danger of being electrocuted.

As soon as the line is crossed, look around the interior of your vehicle and out the windows. If you don’t see any flames or smoke, you aren’t in any danger right away. The most secure thing you can do is to remain indoors.

As soon as you notice flames and smoke, proceed to Method 2 for instructions on how to safely evacuate the vehicle.

If there are any other passengers in the car, inform them that staying inside the vehicle is the safest course of action. Having even one member of your group exiting the car in the wrong manner could put you all in danger of electrocution.

2. Don’t get your hands on the inside of the car. Maintain complete stillness in your car by placing your hands in your lap. Take extra precautions not to make contact with the car’s frame, which may be charged with electrical current.

As long as you remain still and do not come into contact with the car’s frame, you will be safe inside your vehicle.

3. Dial 9-1-1. 911 should be dialled from your cell phone. Please provide them with your address and explain that a power line has fallen on your car. Most likely, they will provide you with some general advice, such as staying in your car, but if they provide you with specific pieces of advice, make sure to follow them.

4. People should be warned not to touch the car or the power line. If you notice cars approaching the power line from behind you or from the opposite lane, honk your horn to warn them that they should not get any closer to the line.

If anyone gets out of their car to investigate or attempt to assist you, tell them loudly that they are not allowed to touch your vehicle or come anywhere near the downed power line.

If you don’t have your cell phone with you and are unable to dial 911, ask anyone who comes up to you if they would be willing to call 911 on your behalf. Instead of asking them to hand you the phone, tell them to call 911 and explain the situation, as well as the location of the downed line.

5. Follow the instructions given by the police. When the dispatchers arrive on the scene, they will approach the car and may ask you questions or provide you with instructions if necessary. Follow their recommendations because they will be in a better position to assess your specific situation. Wait until they tell you that the power to the line has been disconnected and grounded, and that it is safe to exit your vehicle before getting out.

Method 2 Safely Evacuating a Flaming Car

1. Make certain that the car is completely engulfed in flames. Escaping from your car is dangerous, so make absolutely certain that it is not on fire before getting out of your vehicle. You should keep an eye on the smoke to ensure that it is not exhaust from your car. If you see smoke but no flames, call 911 immediately. Smoke is dense and will not dissipate quickly, whereas exhaust will slowly dissipate into the atmosphere.

If you see flames, your car is most likely on fire, and you should get out as quickly and carefully as you can to avoid further damage.

2. Open the door for me. When you notice that your car is on fire, it is critical that you get out as quickly as possible. Open the door latch and push it open, taking care not to touch anything other than the plastic latch and not the door frame or the car.

Because the metal frame of the car is likely to have been charged with electricity by the power line, it is critical that you have as little contact with your car as possible in order to avoid being electrocuted by the car’s metal frame.

3. Bring your legs together and cross your arms in front of your chest. After you unlock the car door and open it, do not exit the vehicle as you normally would. Instead, bring your legs together and slightly inward towards your body, holding them together. In order to be angled to jump out of the car, rotate your body, taking care not to let your feet or any other part of your body touch the car’s frame while doing so.

Reduce the size and volume of your body by crossing your arms over your chest and waist.

4. Get out of the car as quickly as possible. Continue to keep your legs together as you carefully step out of the car and land on both of your feet at the same time to avoid injury. Your chances of getting shocked are greatly reduced if you keep your legs together so that both of your feet are on the ground at the exact same time.

Jump out of the car, don’t slide out of it. It is preferable for your body to be in the air rather than sitting in the car when your feet touch the ground.

5. Get out of your car with a shuffle or hop. After you’ve jumped out of your car, get as far away from the blazing vehicle as you possibly can. Instead of walking and lifting one foot at a time, shuffle out of the car, keeping both feet on the ground at all times and about 6 inches (15 cm) apart from the front and back wheels. Alternatively, you could park your car and walk away from it.

Shuffling or hopping around may make you feel silly, but it might keep you from getting shocked.

If you decide to get out of the car, make sure that both of your feet land on the ground at the same time to avoid tripping.

6. When you are within 50 feet (15.2 metres), dial 911. Continue to shuffling or hopping until you are at least 50 feet (15.2 m) away from your car, then stop. Then get your phone out of your pocket and dial 911. Please provide them with your exact location and inform them that a power line has fallen on your car and that your car is on fire.

When the dispatchers arrive, inform them of the situation and adhere to their safety recommendations.

Please notify any other approaching vehicles of what has occurred and instruct them not to approach or touch either vehicle or the power line. If they are within 50 feet (15.2 metres) of a power line or a car, call their attention to them.

Method 3 Taking Action as a Bystander

1. Do not get too close to the power line or the car. In the event that you are a bystander to a power line falling on someone else’s car, or if you return to find that a power line has fallen on your car, you should not approach the power line within 50 feet (15.2) of it. Approaching the scene is extremely dangerous, but there are ways to assist without putting yourself in harm’s way.

2. Call out to the person who is driving the vehicle. As an alternative to approaching an oncoming vehicle if you see a power line fall on someone else’s car, yell to the person in the car instead. Inquire as to their well-being, and instruct them to refrain from touching the car’s frame or its interior.

“Hello, how are you doing?” or something similar. When they respond, yell over to see if their car is on fire, and if it isn’t, yell over again “In this situation, I know exactly what I’m going to do. Stay in your car and avoid touching the car’s frame or any metal parts of the car, as these can be charged with electricity if they come into contact with them. I’m dialling 911 right now, so assistance will be on its way shortly. As long as you remain in your vehicle, everything will be fine!”

For example, if their car is on fire, “Because your car is on fire, you must get out as quickly and carefully as possible! Turn slowly toward the door of your car, making sure not to touch the car’s frame in the process. Open the door handle only, making sure not to touch any other part of the door. Swing the door open, then jump out so that you land on your feet and not your knees. shuffle away from the car, keeping both feet firmly planted on the ground at all times I’m calling 911 right now, so just concentrate on getting out of the car as safely as possible!”

Be reassuring and let them know that you understand what they are going through. Inform them that as long as they adhere to your instructions, they will be safe and unharmed in any way.

Make sure to inform any approaching vehicles or pedestrians of what has occurred and to warn them not to get closer than 50 feet to the line.

3. Dial 9-1-1. If you haven’t already, signal to the person in the car that you are calling 911 by shouting over their shoulder. Alternatively, if they request that you call for them or are unresponsive, dial 911 and inform the responders of the situation and their location. If you return to your car and discover that a power line has fallen on it, call 911 immediately so that the power line can be deactivated and your car can be driven safely once more.

4. Continue to wait until the dispatchers arrive. Continue to remain on the scene until the emergency responders arrive. The knowledge that there is someone outside who is dealing with the situation will make the occupant of a car who has just witnessed a power line fall on their car feel better. As soon as the dispatchers arrive, go over the situation with them once more. If a power line has fallen on your car, you must follow the instructions of the power company until the car is safe to approach again.

Assuming the power line did not fall directly on your car, you will most likely need to contact a towing company or a mechanic to have your vehicle removed and repaired, unless the damage is only superficial.

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